Salwa Suliman received TMS Starting Grant for the project “STEMreg”

– The award is a great honor for which I am very grateful. Getting your research efforts recognized is every young researcher’s dream, she smiles.

Suliman’s research deals with stem cells; special cells that can repair damaged tissue and bone in a process called regeneration. For decades, stem cells, especially from bone marrow, have been used in the process of creating implantable replacements for bones that do not heal. However, researchers face challenges, as the patient’s immune system responds to the transplanted stem cells.

– These cellular interactions, which are largely unexplored and not understood, affect stem cell therapy. In my project, I will seek to improve the effectiveness of stem cell-based treatments for bone regeneration, by understanding the role of the immune system in this process, says Suliman.

– I hope the project will be a springboard for developing new and better methods, which can positively affect the everyday lives of patients with bone defects and an aging population where the risk of fractures and poor recovery is greater, she says.

The project is an interdisciplinary collaboration both nationally and internationally with The Forsyth Institute (Harvard School of Dental Medicine), National University of Ireland Galway, University of Wuerzburg, Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, University of Oslo and Haukeland University Hospital.

Read more, please visit https://pahoyden.no/forskning-forskningsmidler-tildeling/millionstotte-til-fremtidige-forskningsledere/104049

Kamal Mustafa, Cecilie Gjerde and Marit Bakke in front of 3D-printer. Photo: Jørgen Barth

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